SFPD Ingleside Station Update: Homicide Investigation, Car Break-Ins, and Mind Your Clothes Dryer Vent

SFPD

In the wake of the recent double homicide at the Holly Courts housing project, reader Sarah attended the SFPD Ingleside Station Community Meeting that was held on Tuesday evening. She took some (typically) excellent notes, which we’re republishing here with permission:

Much of the discussionwas related to the Saturday shootings and double homicide at Holly Court. The captain said he could not discuss some elements of the investigation, per department policy, but he did give some information that I had not seen in the press coverage of the incident.

There was a birthday party/barbecue during the day on Saturday inside Holly Court. At around 2pm, there was some kind of “skirmish” between different groups. The police were called; officers responded and detained two people. Later in the evening, the two groups encountered each other again, and that’s when three people were shot, two of whom died. There were three separate crime scenes. 17 people were detained, and one was booked. The incident was so large that officers outside the district had to be called in.

Residents had been concerned in advance of the party and that the person throwing the party was not a resident. The Housing Authority (which is federal, not state/local, and is in charge of the housing projects) is inconsistent at best with respect to enforcing evictions. Under the HUD Code, residents are supposed to be evicted immediately if they commit a crime or their family members commit crimes. The Housing Authority seems not to be consistently enforcing the latter element of the code – ie, that residents should be evicted if their family members or other people they’ve invited to their residence commit crimes. That seems to be very relevant in the case of the Holly Court homicides.

There was a question about the widespread possession of guns in the community and what remedies (police, legal, community) could be employed to combat it. This, in turn, led to a more general discussion of how people are charged and sentenced for crimes in the current environment. One point was that gun possession charges (for example, carrying a concealed weapon without a permit) has very different consequences depending upon the context – someone with no criminal record will get a citation, whereas a convicted felon will be charged with another felony. Another point was that because California prisons are extremely overcrowded these days, anyone who commits a non-violent crime (such as theft, even if the person is responsible for many, many car thefts, break-ins, etc) is very unlikely to serve any prison time. A representative from the DA’s office was in attendance and said that the SF DA seeks the maximum penalty for felony gun-possession cases, which is 90 days in county jail.

I asked about the Holly Park shooting that occurred approximately eight weeks ago when a man was shot in his car around 6:20pm. The captain said the victim is being uncooperative, presumably because he knows the person who shot him.

Other crimes in the district were discussed. Car break-ins and thefts continue to be a problem, especially in Glen Park, Noe Valley, Miraloma Park, and Precita Park. Burglaries are down for the year, and the captain cited vigilant neighbors as being especially helpful in catching burglaries in process. He said that if you see something suspicious, call 553-0123. If it’s a crime in progress, even if it’s not a violent crime, call 911. The most stolen cars continue to be Hondas, Toyotas, Acuras, and Nissans more than 10 years old.

Phone snatching continues to be a problem. As I mentioned in the last summary, the captain emphasized that holding your phone is like waving $200 at a thief, since that’s what they can sell it for. You’re also obviously distracted and an easier mark. The police recently held a surveillance operation at the Balboa Park BART station, where lots of thefts were occurring, and that ring appears to have moved over to the Taraval district now (point being, the theft rings adapt).

The fire battalion chief of the Ocean district was in attendance and warned people to clean out their dryer vents (ie, the tube that goes from the dryer to the outside of your house) since lint is extremely flammable. They’ve had several fires caused by this recently. He said to clean it every one or two months, and there is something you can buy to do this at hardware stores.

PHOTO: Telstar Logistics

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4 Responses to SFPD Ingleside Station Update: Homicide Investigation, Car Break-Ins, and Mind Your Clothes Dryer Vent

  1. GG says:

    I understand the concern about residents inviting violent, gun-toting family members into the projects, but unfortunately this rule is probably poorly-enforced because it has a lot of unintended consequences — most commonly, a grandmotherly-type whose drug-dealing grandson comes to visit her, and she doesn’t know about his criminal behavior. He gets arrested, and then suddenly this poor old lady is getting put out on the street, even though she doesn’t really have any culpability. Whether you think that’s a just result or not, it’s a more common scenario than what seems to have happened in Holly Park, and worth considering when evaluating enforcement of this rule.

  2. guppy says:

    this is why most realtors advise people to buy north of california st. the one good piece of advice I have heard from a realtor in years.

  3. Bronwyn Ximm says:

    What if your clothes dryer isn’t vented to the outside at all? (One of the many funky things about our rented home.)

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