Ancient Godzilla Ancestor Spotted on Bernal Hill

protogodzilla

Mike Stickel documented an impressive proto-Godzilla reptile sighting on Bernal Hill over the weekend:

Caught this little guy sunning himself (and growing his tail back).

PHOTO: Stickel on Instagram

About these ads
This entry was posted in Animals, Bernal Hill, Nature and Wildlife. Bookmark the permalink.

6 Responses to Ancient Godzilla Ancestor Spotted on Bernal Hill

  1. Eugenie Marek says:

    Is this for real? Can anyone identify this creature? Is it indigenous or someone’s escaped pet? How has it managed to survive our over-used open spaces!

  2. wjd says:

    Probably a California Alligator Lizard (Elgaria multicarinata multicarinata) which prefers dry, grassy, high spots like Bernal Hill (as opposed to the the the San Francisco Alligator Lizard (Elgaria coerulea coerulea)). Poor little guy; sometimes their tails only grow back a stubby bit like that.

  3. David West says:

    Great photo. I wonder how it lost its tail.

  4. Ed B says:

    It’s a San Francisco Alligator Lizard and I survived a vicious attack from one a couple of years ago. Called up my pant leg while I was photographing it, I’m sure was voted the craziest person on the Hill that day. Check it out:http://www.flickr.com/photos/ejbsf/5895815179/

    • Eugenie Marek says:

      I looked at your flickr reference. It seems that your dog played a part in what you call a vicious attack. In fact, as you wrote, even after it had been shaken off your pants, your dog “continued to nose it” until it ran away into the grasses. Perhaps your dog had terrified it in the first place, so it ran up your leg to defend itself.
      While I know I risk the wrath of the folks who think dogs first and everywhere, I will say that not all parts of Bernal Hill are meant for off-leash use, the grassy eastern part is even signed to be off limits to dogs in order to preserve what natural habitat is left.
      While I don’t know where you were with your dog, I hope you realize that we need all these creatures to survive up there.

  5. wjd says:

    i guess it could have been either, but E. coerulea coerulea usually likes damper, lower places and can be a little darker/more brown; you’ll often see them near us in Glen Park canyon. E. multicarinata multicarinata likes scrubby, serpentine places like Bernal Hill and can be a little lighter/more yellow.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s