Bernal Artist Leah Rosenberg Uses Our City as Her Palette

Day13

Day14

neighborleahchair

Day33

It’s hard to comprehend how Bernal Heights squeezes so many remarkable artists into one not-so-big neighborhood. But apparently, we do it.

7×7 tells us about a new show by Leah Rosenberg, the same Bernal artist who created the fabtastic color wall inside Pinhole Coffee on Cortland. Pinhole’s wall represents various colors found around Bernal Heights, and Neighbor Leah’s current project explores similar ideas about riffing on colors found in the city around us. But in a rather different way. 7×7 says:

For the last two months, Bernal Heights-based artist and California College of the Arts graduate Leah Rosenberg has been painting a small storefront—three walls, a floor, a desk, a chair, and a vase—a different color every day. The whole thing, covered in a single solid hue. It’s out on Irving Street, a block from Outerlands and Trouble Coffee in the Outer Sunset, and Rosenberg decides which colors to use based on what she finds in the neighborhood: an acid yellow fence, the pistachio exterior of the Francis Scott Key Elementary School Auditorium, a light purple crab on Ocean Beach.

“I keep thinking of this one line I like, ‘And you call yourself a painter,’” Rosenberg says with a laugh, “because painting as a verb, the actual act of applying color to a surface, that is fundamentally what it is.” And yet the installation, part of Kelly Falzone Inouye’s residency space Irving Street Projects, has become something more. Locals who might otherwise walk down Judah, stroll Irving instead to see what the color of the day is (Rosenberg keeps a handy sandwich board out front). Kids come by after school to help. ol to help. Recently, Rosenberg took everyone on an “inspiration walk” to all the spots that sparked her creativity. In a way, she’s been painting the landscape of the Outer Sunset.

Check out the amazing photos of Neighbor Leah’s “Everyday, A Color”, and watch her in action at Irving Street Projects (4331 Irving St.) before the show closes on May 29. She’s also installed a new site-specific piece inside The Mill (736 Divisadero) that will be up until early July.

Bonus Linky Linky: Here is a good interview with Neighbor Leah that has terrific photos taken inside her Bernal home.

PHOTOS: “Everyday, A Color” by Leah Rosenberg. HAT TIP: Neighbor Leila

Sporty New Sutro Tower Tote Was Born In Bernal (And For You, Special Price)

3quarter view concrete SMALL

Brook McLeod commutes to work in Bernal Heights from the neighboring hills of Potrero, but her roots here run deep, and prolonged exposure to Bernalese culture has given her a keen sense of our locavore style and funky-functional aesthetic. The ways of our people have rubbed off on her to such an extent that she’s even started a new company called Wool Street (Note: Bernal-born name) to produce cool urban accessories. And as a Citizen of Bernalwood, you get a discount.

Brook tells us:

Wool Street was birthed in Bernal, where a sense of supporting local businesses and neighbors is a way of life.

This idea of a soft goods line made in the USA and if all possible in the future made completely in San Francisco came to me when I was living in a cottage on Wool Street. My husband, Dave was born and raised in Bernal Heights, and after we both graduated from CCAC (California College of Arts & Crafts) we moved back to his beloved hood. I quickly felt right at home with its small town vibe -I’m originally from a town of 2500 people in southeastern Washington- and I instantly wanted to be a part of the BH.

I worked at Heartfelt for nearly 5 years behind the scenes, learning how a successful small business ran, and left only last year to pursue my own small business dreams. I also had the opportunity to help the Bernal Library Art Project (BLAP) with phase III of their initiative to put art up on the Bernal Library. Through BLAP I got to meet more quirky, interesting, and influential neighbors that help in making Bernal Heights what it really is…awesome! We now live in Potrero Hill but I’m continuing to work part-time at the New Wheel with Brett, Karen & the gang, so I can still get my Bernal fix every week.

Without further ado I wanted to introduce Wool Street’s debut product: the Sutro Tower Canvas Tote, made in San Francisco-Woot!

Although I know it’s not the infamous Sutrito, I wanted to extend a discount to all Bernalwood lovers for $5 OFF with promo code BERNAL to apply at checkout. Please take a peek and check back for more products soon.

PHOTOS: Wool Street

ALIENS FROM OUTER SPACE INVADE BOCANA!

AlienBocana

Moments before she was carried away by a beam of blue light to become the subject of an unspeakable exobiology experiment regimen, Neighbor Sarah sent Bernalwood this confirmed photo of an alien landing site on Bocana.

We hope that Neighbor Sarah will be back soon, with minimal scar tissue and her memory throughly wiped.

PHOTO: Neighbor Sarah

Median Price of a Bernal Home Jumps 57% Since 2013

5-15_bernal_Median_House-Prices_by-Neighborhood

According to the latest market report from Paragon Real Estate, the median price of a home in Bernal Heights now stands at $1.4 million. Our friends at CurbedSF wrote up the summary:

Although neighborhoods like Bayview, Bernal Heights, and Glen Park are considered to be among the more affordable in the city, they have all seen tremendous appreciation over the past two years. Back in April 2013, the median price for a Bayview house was just $447,000. It grew by 7.4 percent to hit $480,000 in 2014 and then soared 31.2 percent to its current $630,000. Bernal, of course, has been widely talked about as a hot neighborhood, and its prices reflect that reputation. In April 2013, you could get a median Bernal home for just $880,000. That number grew by 31.2 percent to $1.154 million in 2014 and has now grown another 19.6 percent to hit $1.38 million this year. Glen Park has seen similar trends, growing from $1.205 million in 2013 to $1.835 million now.

Bayview-Bernal-2013-2015

What’s the cause of the this dizzying price appreciation? Even a high school student can explain it to you: Mr. Supply and Mr. Demand aren’t moving in parallel, and they haven’t moved in parallel for a long time. There are a whole lot of people who want a place to live in San Francisco, but there are very few places available for them to buy. Curbed looks at the issue citywide:

As always, low inventory is part of the issue in San Francisco. New listings this spring barely topped 600 per month, compared with about 700 per month last year and 800 two years ago. And while 3,454 new-construction housing units were completed in 2014, the most in the past 20 years according to Paragon’s tally of Planning Department figures, it still isn’t enough in a city where the economy is booming and new residents are flooding into town.

Bernal seems to have had a particularly low number of listings of late. According to this March 2015 summary by realtor and neighbor Danielle Lazier, there were just 9 properties listed for sale in Bernal in March, which represented a 53% decrease from the year before. And when houses do come on the market in Bernal, they tend to sell with neck-straining quickness. Neighbor Danielle’s data says that in March, Bernal homes sold after an average of just 15 days on the market, or 50% faster than a year before.

mar15sfhinventory-2

CHARTS: Paragon Real Estate and SFHotlist

Welcome to Dernal Heights, Where All The Durritos Follow Burrito Law

DernalHeights.Burrito2

These are strange days for San Francisco burritos.

On the one hand, it is the best of times: San Francisco-style burritos are more popular than ever before. Quant-geeks rate them. Big chains mass-produce them. Yet with this culinary clout comes the inevitable copycats who seek to offer San Francisco-style burritos on far-distant shores — often with mixed results. Now, in one such effort to capture the spirit of the San Francisco burrito far away from the actual tierra that provides its substance, Bernal Heights has become a casualty.

Or rather, “Dernal Heights.”

The photo you see above was taken at the newest outlet of the burgeoning Mission Burrito restaurant chain, in Brindleyplace, Birmingham, England:

missionburriosplash

We can’t say much about the quality of the burritos from Mission Burrito (especially after so much long-distance travel), but we did notice a nontrivial problem with the big map of San Francisco painted on the wall of the new Brindleyplace location. Look just south of the Mission District on the wall map shown in this Brindleyplace store photo-montage, and you’ll see a shape that accurately replicates the outline of our own neighborhood.

But it is labeled “Dernal Heights.”

DernalHeights.Burrito

How. Awkward.

(Note: We stand in solidarity with our urban neighbors to the northeast, who apparently live in “Retrero Hill.”)

In light of this embarrassing faux pas, and even more heinous crimes against burritodom such as this, none other than Burrito Justice, La Lengua’s rebel spokesblogger and carnitas-fueled provocateur, has taken it upon himself to codify a set of standards governing what is and is not a proper burrito:

Despite our best efforts, we are seeing escalating threats, both international and domestic, against the sanctity of burritos. This must cease.

By the powers vested in me by the City and Country of San Francisco, Junipero Serra and Febronio Ontiveros, I hereby declare BURRITO LAW:

Statute 1:
If you pull off all the foil, it is no longer a burrito.

Statute 2:
If you touch it with a knife and fork, it is no longer a burrito

We frankly cannot believe these first two statutes are necessary but that is what things have come to, folks. It is indeed an era so dark that our next statue is sadly required. Brace yourselves:

Statute 3:
If you get it outside the Bay Area, it is no longer a burrito.

That’s right people, not all cylinders are created equal. We have no choice but to implement appellation d’origine contrôlée de burrito: if it’s not made in a county that touches San Francisco Bay, it’s not a burrito. (OK, fine, Santa Cruz too. Any county that touches a county that touches the Bay. But we get to disqualify any burritos in these secondary counties. Caveat Burritor.)

These are rigid criteria, to be sure. But as the Citizens of Dernalwood, the necessity of such standards is now painfully clear for all to see. Because a durrito from distant lands is not a burrito that can be trusted to get the details right.

dernalwood

PHOTOS: Mission Burrito

Thursday: Bernal Brothers Exhibit Awesome, Big-Format Wilderness Photography

GlassLake-LakesOfDesolation2

Neighbor Tim Mullen and his brother Mike are in the large-format photographic printing business, and tomorrow evening, May 14, he and his brother are hosting an exhibit of some California wilderness photos. Naturally, you are so invited:

Tim Mullen of the 200 block of Elsie Street here, writing to let you know of an event taking place on Thursday, May 14 that may be of interest to Bernalites.

I’m half of the Mullen Brothers Imaging team that made the historic photos that were on display at Pinhole Coffee. The other half of this team, Brother Mike, is working on the massive task of photo-documenting all of the lakes of Desolation Wilderness (just West of Lake Tahoe). There are hundreds of lakes there, both named and un-named. The project focusses on the natural beauty of this pristine wilderness, but also touches on the ideas of solitude in a state of 34 million people and the very timely issue of water scarcity.

On May 14, from 6 to 9 PM, our company Mullen Brothers Imaging will host a gallery exhibition of many of the images collected to date. Out gallery is at 2040 Oakdale Ave. in 94110.

PHOTO: Mullen Brothers Imaging