Artist Amos Goldbaum Unveils Sexy New Bernal Hill T-Shirt



Artist Amos Goldbaum was born and raised in Bernal Heights, and he still lives here today. He’s rather well known around town for his intricate illustrations of iconic San Francisco landmarks, and his work looks great on your body or on your building. He’s also a local history geek, so his images are often inspired by historical views of our magical city.

Neighbor Amos tells Bernalwood he will unveil a new illustration on Sunday at the fabulous Fiesta on the Hill, and appropriately, it’s a sexy new image of Bernal Hill!

I have a new Bernal shirt I’ll be releasing at the Fiesta on the Hill this weekend. It’s drawn from Max Kirkeberg’s 1973 photo from Holly Park that Bernalwood posted a bit ago.


View from Holly Park, 1973

Tangentially, while I was perusing Max’s collection I saw this 1980 shot of Army and South Van Ness, and I thought it was a nice in-between to your 1950’s to 2008 comparison a while back.

So cool. Say hello to Neighbor Amos and get one of his sexy shirts at Fiesta this weekend, or you can pick one up on the Interwebs via the remote-control magic of ecommerce.

PHOTOS: illustrations, shirt via Amos Goldbaum

Bernal Artist “Redesigns” Starbucks Ads in Powell BART Station




Neighbor “Ominous” is an artist who lives in Bernal Heights. Moments ago, Bernalwood received this email from him/her/it:

On any given evening, Powell Street BART Station will be lined end-to-end with homeless. The station is also completely wrapped in 360 degrees of advertisements. Brands attempting to capture the tech cash that is flying left and right.

The workers that stream through this same hall (of which I am one) innovate to solve problems for the wealthy. We pride ourselves on our white-hot innovation economy. But we are not solving the right problems. $15 Salad Delivery. Apps where someone else will park your car for you, pick up and do your laundry for you.

This hall embodies the denial of San Francisco. It’s always striking and unnerving to see the down and out sleeping inside the marketing campaign of the day.

Lately, Powell Street Station has been home to a the Starbucks ‘Skip the Queue” campaign — an app that lets you order ahead so you can skip the queue. A ‘problem’ deemed worth solving.

This morning, that campaign got a surprise make-over.


PHOTOS: via Ominous

Bernal Artist Offers Handy, Handmade Moon Calendars For 2016


After our spooky moon sightings and a super rare bloodmoon, it’s already been a great lunar year. Luckily, Neighbor Annie on Precita near York has been making moon calendars for the past five years, and she recently cooked up a new batch.

Wolf moon! Snow moon! Sturgeon moon! Beaver moon! Who knew there were so many moons?

Neighbor Annie says:

I originally began making these calendars as holiday gifts for loved ones when I moved here from Canada five years ago. They were so popular that I kept doing it, changing the design each time since I knew I wouldn’t want to look at the same calendar every year. Plus, it keeps it fun! This year, I was looking to give it a bit of an art nouveau/architectural feel. I hope it reads that way!

If you’re in the neighbourhood and you want to do a local pick up, just send me a message and we can arrange one.

Alternatively, you can also pick them up on her online store. They’re two-color screenprints that measure 16×20 inches — plenty big enough to ensure you’ll never to miss another full moon again. Plus, they’ll look great on the wall of your personal observatory.

PHOTO: via Annie Axtell

Tonight: Dr. Sketchy’s (Rather Raunchy) Anti-Art School


Neighbor Laurie Wigham, subcommandante of the Bernal Heights watercoloristas, brings word about a saucy lil’ event for artists happening tonight at the Principality of Chicken John:

Did you know that San Francisco’s coolest (hottest?), sexiest, silliest and most-fun life drawing group meets in (where else but) Bernal Heights? Dr. Sketchy’s Anti-Art School started in New York city but has spread all over the world, from New Zealand to Nashville, and has been meeting in our neighborhood for three years.

The models are an ever-changing parade of wildly costumed characters, including performers from the New Burlesque movement, aerialists, acrobats, yogis, Aztec dancers—and even the Sisters of Perpetual Indulgence. There’s a strong commitment to celebrating SF’s diverse local culture and community.

Dr Sketchy’s happens at Chicken John’s Warehouse on Cesar Chavez, near Mission. It meets every other Tuesday, 7-10 pm, and the next one is September 15th. The model will be Eva Von Slut, rock ’n roll singer for Thee Merry Widows and White Barons. $15 at the door. Anyone 21+ is welcome

Tuesday, September 15, 7-10 pm
Chicken John’s Warehouse/SF Institute of Possibility
3359 Cesar Chavez St (@Mission)

Read more about the local branch, here.
Check out the Facebook group, here.
And the Flickr group, here.


PHOTO: A Dr. Sketchy SF event, via Neighbor Laurie

Celebrate the Book Neighbor Anita Wrote and Illustrated, “The Magical World of Abra”


Neighbor Anita Ellis wrote and illustrated a new book, called “The Magical World of Abra.” It was a ton of work, so now she wants to celebrate, with a big book release party and art show on Saturday night.

Neighbor Anita provides the rest of the details:

 My name is Anita and I ‘m having a book release party. I’ve lived in Bernal Heights for 20 years.

The title of the book is called “The Magical World of Abra” and the book release party is Saturday, September 12 at Code and Canvas Gallery (151 Potero Ave.)  from 6-9pm.  There will be a children’s book reading at 6:30, live music, food and cocktails.

The backstory: My friend and co-worker at The Wild Side West in Bernal Heights had a story she wanted me to illustrate. And I should really thank her, or this project would have never happened. Her story was based on a little girl who was a collector/hoarder who took things she found home with her until her room is completely cluttered.

I have taken every painting and illustration class offered at city college and have been doing art since I was a little kid so I figured that it would be fun, and I was up for the challenge. I had done a handful of illustrations for her but she did not really seem to like the images I created, and I was not really following what she had in mind.

Friends encouraged me to work on it on my own when they saw the artwork I had done. So instead of writing about a hoarder, I decided to write about a little girl named Abra who sees the beauty of everyday objects and life. Hence the title, “The Magical World of Abra.”

I’ve probably spent over 10,000 hours on the illustrations, hand-written text, book-binding, art classes and the story created. I met Attaboy who is an amazing artist and one of the founders of Hi-Fructose magazine. One of the things he said that stood out to me was that you are what you do. Don’t do whatever it is you love half-ass; do it times 1000. Get into it, surpass your own and everyone else’s expectations. That is when you will know you are doing it right.

The message of the story is one for adults and children and we need to be kept aware of it daily: Look around you, there is beauty everywhere and so many things are working in our favor. There is always something special and magical there, even if it’s the darkest of clouds above you. Suck it up, inhale it and live it because one day you will not be here to enjoy it.

ILLUSTRATION: Courtesy of Neighbor Anita Ellis

Bids Due, Tensions High as Trustee Says Precita Eyes Seeks to “Force Family to Sell to Them”


It’s been a big week for 348 Precita Avenue, the multi-unit building on Precita Park that’s long been home to the Precita Eyes mural studio. 348 Precita is for sale, and Precita Eyes hopes to avoid possible eviction by deterring would-be buyers from bidding on the property. (For more backstory, read Bernalwood’s item about this from  Monday.)

Here at week’s end, let’s catch up on where thing stand.

Neighbor Ledia dropped by Precita Eyes during a Protest Art Class for kids on Tuesday, where she learned more about Precta Eyes, their history in Precita Park, their other property holdings, and their (at times confusing) arrangement with the Mission Economic Development Agency (MEDA). Neighbor Ledia tells Bernalwood:

Went to the free art class and talked to Precita Eyes today: Now I understand.

So Precita Eyes wants the owners [of 348 Precita] to accept MEDAs offer to buy the building, which has 3 residential units plus the commercial Precita Eyes space, for $1 million.

It’s obviously “worth” more. MEDA would then be the owner/landlord, with the possibly of current tenants being able to buy their spaces in some way.

348 is the original Precita Eyes space. Precita Eyes has been around since 1977, and in this space since 1982. In 1998, [Precita Eyes founder Susan Cervantes] bought the Precita Eyes space on 24th St., so the organization also has that.

The goal of the free art class/gathering is to discourage offers on the building, other than MEDA’s lowball offer.

This provides helpful context. Precita Eyes uses 348 Precita as a satellite facility, and in the comments to Monday’s post, several Bernal neighbors noted that the studio at 348 is rarely occupied. (As a neighbor, Bernalwood can confirm this.) The Precita Eyes branch at 2981 24th Street is the organization’s main office, but we did not know (and Mission Local confirms) that Precita Eyes actually owns the 24th Street building. That means the future of Precita Eyes on 24th Street is secure.

Of course, there are two sides to every transaction, and in the comments to Bernalwood’s Monday post, a member of the family that’s selling 348 Precita shared some details (which are merged here for clarity):

My name is Michael Silva. I am not the owner of 348 Precita (certainly not the only owner), but only the trustee of my late mom’s estate.

I am a member of the family that owns this property. Our presence in SF dates back to before the 1906 earthquake (they camped out in the park during the repairs). It has been in our family for a hundred years. Look up August &Minnie Schmidt in the 1915 online directory.


1915 San Francisco Directory, via Bernalwood

One of the owners is the 83 year old granddaughter of August and Minnie. Another is a great-grandson who worked all his life in SF until he had to retire under medical disability, and who has had multiple surgeries to help the back injuries he suffered while working as a printer. His entire life savings consists of $11,000.

These are the owners to whom Precita Eyes is trying to dictate sale terms. This is the one and only commercial property the family owns, in SF or anywhere else. We are not “big investors” by any stretch of the imagination.

I am actually just the Trustee of my mom’s estate (born in SF in 1932). She and her twin sister co-owned the property until she passed away a few years ago. Now my mom’s estate, along with her twin sister, are trying to sell the property. And Precita Eyes is trying to make sure we do not receive fair market value for a property that has been in our family for at least 100 years.

What Precita Eyes is trying to do is to force the family to sell to them, on their terms and on their terms alone, and obviously below market value (or else they would just submit their bid along with any other potential buyers). Who thinks this is moral behavior on their part?

This sets up a curious dynamic. In a town where one’s standing on questions of housing policy and social entitlement often correlates to how long you’ve lived here, the story of 348 Precita now contrasts a nonprofit arts organization that’s been in Bernal for 30+ years with a multigenerational family that’s been in Bernal for 100.

Last Tuesday, there was a open house at at 348 Precita for potential buyers to view the property. Precita Eyes put signs in the windows, brought in some local kids for an ad hoc protest art class, invited a few journalists from around town to drop by, and launched their campaign to ward off potential bidders.

Sarah Hotchkiss from KQED Arts was there:

As toddlers covered in tempera paint plastered their hand prints all over sheets of paper, community members surrounded the building holding their own pieces of paper, printed with the message, “Please do not BUY this building!! This is a community space!”


Photo: KQED

The organization staged the protest after landlords posted a brand-new For Sale sign on the studio center’s exterior the week before. Though Precita Eyes owns its arts and visitors center at 2981 24th St, they have rented the 348 Precita Ave space since 1977.

While impending doom lingers in the air, the building’s residents are not without hope. The Mission Economic Development Agency (MEDA), with advice from the San Francisco Community Land Trust (SFCLT), plans to make a bid on the property, which, if successful, will safeguard Precita Eyes and the residential tenants against eviction by forming a cooperative.

The dispatch from Mission Local’s reporter captured the kabuki-like flavor of the scene, as the participants performed familiar roles:

“We’re hoping to dissuade other prospective buyers from outbidding MEDA,” explained Nancy Pili Hernández, a Precita Eyes muralist.

Several prospective buyers came and went without comment. Some stopped to talk with the activists and neighbors standing outside. In some cases, the exchanges became heated.  Pili Hernández said one potential buyer became incensed when a woman approached him asking his intentions for the building. Pili Hernández said the man told the woman he would put in an offer for $2 million and evict her.

That’s the kind of possibility that makes Randy Odell, an upstairs resident of 30 years, uneasy.

“It’s no fun having your home threatened.” Odell said. “When you have no right to keep people from coming in and looking at your home, and sussing out the value, it’s very hard to keep my dignity.”

Other potential buyers took a more diplomatic approach.

Micheal Zook, a San Francisco native and former building manager who was once evicted from a building he lived and worked in for 20 years, now works as a realtor but was considering the building as a potential home for himself, his wife and his children. He talked at length with community organizers about the property and how displacement could be avoided.

So what happens next?

Although the drama of 348 Precita is playing out in 2015, this story is really a flashback to the proto-gentrification tensions of 1970s Bernal Heights, when a young generation of activist Baby Boomers arrived and set out to transform Bernal in their own image, sometimes to the dismay of the older, blue-collar families who already lived here.

Back then, however, San Francisco’s population was in decline, and Bernal Heights was considered a faded part of town.  Homes were cheap,  rents were cheaper, Precita Park was rough, and Bernal was a funky bohemian backwater. Today, San Francisco’s population has grown by almost 200,000 since 1980, Bernal is a prime location, Precita Park is a four-star destination, countercultural lifestyles are difficult to afford, and the median home price in the neighborhood hovers around $1.4 million. A big property like 348 Precita could obviously fetch more.

But should it? Will it? We’ll find out soon; Mike Silva tells Bernalwood the last bids for the property are coming in today.

PHOTOS: Top, Precita Eyes studio by Telstar Logistics

Tonight! Celebrate the 8th Anniversary of Secession Art & Design


Secession Art & Design is a Bernal Heights treasure, and tonight it’s proud proprietor, Ms. Eden Stein, is celebrating her store’s eighth anniversary.

It’s hard to emphasize how hard she’s worked to make this happen. Secession has always been awesome, but when she lost her lease in the space across from Safeway in 2014, Ms. Eden had to scramble to keep Secession alive. Thankfully, through lots of hustle and a little good luck, Secession was able to re-open in the former SoCha Cafe space at 3235 Mission (near Valencia). Today, the store is bigger and more vibrant than ever, Ms. Eden is a pillar of the glamorous Mission-Bernal Merchants Association, and Secession become an  integral part of La Lengua’s increasingly lively (and delicious) Mission Street corridor.

Ms. Eden writes:

I am hosting our 8th anniversary on Friday night!

Secession is throwing a party to celebrate 8 years in the Mission Bernal neighborhood. Please join us this Friday, August 14 6:30 to 9:30 pm to honor what we’ve all built. Meet our featured artists Andreina Davila, Heather Robinson, as well as many others who’ve been part of our community over the past eight years.

Sometimes you have to dream big and just go for it. Thank you to everyone who helped us on our journey to our new home when we lost our lease a year ago. Thanks to your support, we were able to stay in the neighborhood and relocate to our beautiful 3235 Mission Street gallery and boutique. You rock!

Many of you have asked how you can help us to make sure Secession is part of the arts community and the changing San Francisco retail landscape. If you’d like to support us, the best way is to shop in-store (we’re open Tuesday-Sunday, noon to 7pm), shop online, or donate to our ongoing fundraiser.

Hope to see you tonight.

Congratulations, Eden, and best wishes for 800 more fabulous years!

IMAGE: Courtesy of Secession Art &; Design